Eric Clark's Travel Videos – Blagaj Bosnia – Dervish monastery with Water coming from Mountain

Eric Clark's Travel Videos – Blagaj Bosnia – Dervish monastery with Water coming from Mountain

Eric Clark’s Travel Videos – Blagaj Bosnia – Dervish monastery with Water coming from Mountain

From Wikipedia
“Blagaj is a village-town in the south-eastern region of the Mostar basin, in the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It stands at the edge of Bišće plain and is one of the most valuable mixed urban and rural structures in Bosnia and Herzegovina, distinguished from other similar structures in its urban layout.[1] Blagaj was most likely named for its mild weather patterns since blaga in Serbo-Croatian means “mild”.[2] Blagaj is situated at the spring of the Buna river and a historical tekke (tekija or Dervish monastery). The Blagaj Tekija was built around 1520, with elements of Ottoman architecture and Mediterranean style[3][4] and is considered a national monument. Blagaj Tekke is a monastery built for the Dervish cults.

During the classical antiquity there existed an Illyrian fortress and a Roman castrum. During the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian, several fortified towns were built in the area. Blagaj was mentioned in Constantine Porphyrogenitus’ work De Administrando Imperio as Bona, then part of Zahumlje (Hum).
In the late 12th century, during the rule of Stefan Nemanja (Grand Principality of Serbia), prefect Jurko raised a church dedicated to saints Cosmas and Damian. In the 14th century, during the reign of Bosnian Ban Stjepan II Kotromanić, Hum became part of the Bosnian state. In the 15th century Sandalj Hranić Kosača and his nephew Stephen Vukčić Kosača ruled the Hum and Blagaj territory until the arrival of the Ottomans in 1466. Blagaj is also known as a residential area of Bosnian rulers and particularly of royal families Hranić and Kosača.
In historical sources Blagaj was first mentioned in 1423. During the period of the Ottoman Empire, Blagaj was the seat of the Blagaj Vilayet, and was divided into several neighborhoods. The city had seven mosques, two inns, four musafirhana (guest houses), a madrasa (Bosnian: medresa), two maktab, seven mills and four stone bridges on the river Buna. Bosniaks were majority until 1835, during the Austro-Hungarian period Christians constituted twice as many. An Orthodox Church was built in 1893 and a Roman Catholic church in 1908. ”

My name is Eric Clark and I am a world traveler. I have been around the world a few times and decided to help fund my travels by sharing my videos and pictures. I have been to almost every country and would be glad to give tips and pointers. Drop me a note. = )
Eric Clark's Travel Videos - Blagaj Bosnia - Dervish monastery with Water coming from Mountain