MAINLINE USA ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS 1940s HISTORY OF TRAIN TRAVEL 70884a

MAINLINE USA   ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS  1940s HISTORY OF TRAIN TRAVEL  70884a
The Association of American Railroads’ 1957 film, Mainline USA, produced and directed by Carl Dudley, is an overview of the industry and its role in the U.S. The film provides a good general overview while featuring a number of shots of train engines and lines, including a Santa Fe FT (04:28), B&O E units, PRR Baldwin Sharknoses, an Alco FA-1 (11:25), and a Rio Grande F. The film opens with shots of iconic American scenes, including the Statue of Liberty (00:52), Mt. Rushmore, the Capitol Building, Yosemite Falls (01:22), and bustling city streets. A Northern Pacific train cruises along its tracks (01:40) as the narrator discusses the importance of America’s railways, including the early days of trains. The film presents a number of industrial shots, including mills, manufacturing complexes (05:13), and automobile assembly lines (02:11), all of which rely on the railroad industry one way or another. The train industry is responsible for initially connecting the vast, rural country. The film continues with various scenes of trains traveling throughout cities and rural areas. One of the major roles the railroads play is to transport goods, including food, clothes, and cars. Trains transport grains and fruits from farmlands to the cities. Other commodities the film shows being transported by rail are coal (05:54) from Pennsylvania and West Virginia, copper from the large copper mine in Butte, Montana (06:06), lumber, cattle, and cotton. Railroads also play a crucial role in transporting Americans; and bustling train stations (07:15) were often the hub of major American cities prior to the 1950s. Modern trains with luxury day cars (07:46), lounge and club cars, and sleeping cars accommodate travelers of every kind. Trains transport people to America’s beautiful destinations, including holiday trips where vacationers ride horses (08:16), fly fish mountain rivers (08:20), enjoy the sun upon sandy beaches (08:22), and marvel at natural splendors like Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park (08:31). The film provides an overview of the railroad industry (09:19) and how it impacts the U.S. economy, as railroads spend millions every year on trains, tracks and more, buying nearly 1/5 of all coal, oil, and lumber in the U.S. The film also discusses the various roles Americans play in the railroad industry and how railroads are funded. Railroads are unique in that they provide their own facilities, build their own rail lines (11:46), and maintain those lines—such as plowing snow off of them (11:54). The film concludes with scenes of American sporting events and places of education as it informs viewers of where railroad tax dollars go.

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This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com

MAINLINE USA ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS 1940s HISTORY OF TRAIN TRAVEL 70884a

2 thoughts on “MAINLINE USA ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS 1940s HISTORY OF TRAIN TRAVEL 70884a”

  1. Thank you, Periscope Films, for preserving all of these old short subjects! 👍 These short vignettes are small slices of America as it was when our parents and grandparents were our ages. It's something that has been forgotten in today's sterilized, homogenized, use-it-up-and-throw-it-away society which seems to have no time for how things were.

    We as a People, and a Society, need to SLOW DOWN a little and wax nostalgic — even if only for a few moments — and look at how we got to where we are now. If it hadn't been for the pre-computer industrial revolution from the 1850's to the 1960's, we would still be stuck in those early Univac/switchboard/slide rule days.

    I, for one, love these forays into our recent industrial and technical past, a time before computers when people had to actually THINK about how to invent a new idea or solve a problem, back when the slide rule was the calculator of the day. Today's youth may not believe it, but during that technological era we called the Industrial Revolution, we got along just fine without computerized thinking machines, back when a computer was an actual "person" who created and revised logarithms and actuary tables, and the adding machine of the day was a machine called a "difference engine."

    It is definitely something to think about and remember.

  2. Im very happy with ALL your videos and rejected by younger people when I push these wonderful videos people don't have my interest

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